CLEAN HANDS AND HOME

The Inventor of Handwashing

The Inventor of Handwashing

The Inventor of Handwashing

Recognizing Ignaz Semmelwei and  Handwashing. Doodle on how to properly wash your hands from WHO

Recognizing Ignaz Semmelwei and  Handwashing from Google Doodle and World Health Organization.  

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World Hygene Organizations

The Inventor of Handwashing

The Inventor of Handwashing

global health partners foster hygene in communities around the world, sanitation, clean water, kids

 Global partners to increase access to safe drinking water, adequate sanitation and appropriate hygiene. 

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Clean & Disinfect Home

The Inventor of Handwashing

Clean & Disinfect Home

Clean woman in clean home; recommendations for routine cleaning and disinfection of households

 General recommendations for routine cleaning and disinfection of households

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How to Wash Hands

FDA on Antibacterial Soaps

Clean & Disinfect Home

Wash hands Help protect yourself and your family to stay healthy.

Help protect yourself and your family to stay healthy.

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FDA on Antibacterial Soaps

FDA on Antibacterial Soaps

FDA on Antibacterial Soaps

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Antibacterial Soap? You Can Skip It, Use Plain Soap and Water

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CLEAN AND DISINFECT HANDS

HOW TO WASH YOUR HANDS

Handwashing information from CDC:

Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Learn when and how you should wash your hands to stay healthy.


Wash Your Hands Often to Stay Healthy

You can help yourself and your loved ones stay healthy by washing your hands often, especially during these key times when you are likely to get and spread germs:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after caring for someone at home who is sick with vomiting or diarrhea
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage


Follow Five Steps to Wash Your Hands the Right Way

Washing your hands is easy, and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of germs. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community—from your home and workplace to childcare facilities and hospitals.


FOLLOW THESE FIVE (5) STEPS EVERYTIME

1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.

2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.

3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.

4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.

5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.



Use Hand Sanitizer When You Can’t Use Soap and Water

  • You can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to get rid of germs in most situations. If soap and water are not readily available, you can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. You can tell if the sanitizer contains at least 60% alcohol by looking at the product label.
  • Sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in many situations. However, Sanitizers do not get rid of all types of germs.
  • Hand sanitizers may not be as effective when hands are visibly dirty or greasy.
  • Hand sanitizers might not remove harmful chemicals from hands like pesticides and heavy metals.

Caution! Swallowing alcohol-based hand sanitizers can cause alcohol poisoning if more than a couple of mouthfuls are swallowed. Keep it out of reach of young children and supervise their use. Learn more here in CDC article: Show Me the Science – When & How to Use Hand Sanitizer in Community Settings


  • How to use hand sanitizer
  • Apply the gel product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount).
  • Rub your hands together.
  • Rub the gel over all the surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. This should take around 20 seconds.



Most important: Keep calm and wash your hands.


Inventor of handwashing

Recognizing Ignaz Semmelweis and Handwashing.   Today’s Doodle follows the official recommendation on how to properly wash your hands from the World Health Organization.  

Google Doodle honors handwashing pioneer Dr. Ignaz Semmelwei

Pregnant women, death during delivery, rate drops 17% in two months when handwashing discovered

The practice of washing one's hands was first proposed in 1847 by Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis, a German-Hungarian physician and scientist known as the " pioneer of antiseptic procedures ."  Google Doodle animates how to prevent spreading disease and how to wash your hands while recognizing Semmelweis.  As chief resident in the maternity clinic of the Vienna General Hospital, where  he concluded that he and the medical students carried "cadaverous particles" on their hands from the autopsy room to the patients they examined in the First Obstetrical Clinic. This explained why the student midwives in the Second Clinic, who were not engaged in autopsies and had no contact with corpses, saw a much lower mortality rate. He discovered a link between transmitted germs and a high mortality rate in new mothers. 


The two clinics used identical techniques, so the cause was baffling.  Semmelweis ordered students and doctors to wash their hands in a solution of chlorinated lime before each examination.  Here are his results:  In May of 1847, the death rate of pregnant women at the clinic was 18.3% when he implemented hand washing.  In July, just a few short months later, the rate dropped to 1.2%.


Semmelweis, years later, became known as the 'savior of mothers', died in 1865 at the age of 47, just 14 days after being committed to an asylum. There, he suffered a beating by guards that resulted in an infected hand, which may have caused his death.


Learn More about Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis at: Cnet, Google,  Wikipedia

CLEAN AND DISINFECT HOUSEHOLD

HOW TO CLEAN AND DISINFECT HOUSEHOLD

See more information on how to clean and disinfect from CDC:



Cleaning refers to the removal of germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces. Cleaning does not kill germs, but by removing them, it lowers their numbers and the risk of spreading infection.


Disinfecting refers to using chemicals to kill germs on surfaces. This process does not necessarily clean dirty surfaces or remove germs, but by killing germs on a surface after cleaning, it can further lower the risk of spreading infection.


How to Clean & Disinfect 

General Recommendations for Routine Cleaning and Disinfection of Households (including ill person care)


Background

  • There is much to learn about the novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). 
  • Novel coronavirus and similar coronaviruses that cause SARS and MERS are spread from person-to-person with these viruses happens most frequently among close contacts (within about 6 feet). This type of transmission occurs via respiratory droplets. 
  • Transmission of novel coronavirus to persons from surfaces contaminated with the virus has not been documented. 
  • Current evidence suggests that novel coronavirus may remain viable for hours to days on surfaces made from a variety of materials. 
  • Cleaning of visibly dirty surfaces followed by disinfection is a best practice measure for prevention of COVID-19 and other viral respiratory illnesses in households and community settings.
  • These guidelines are focused on household settings and are meant for the general public.  (See OSHA for business environments)


General Recommendations for Routine Cleaning and Disinfection of Households

  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces daily in household common areas (e.g. tables, hard-backed chairs, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, sinks) with household cleaners and EPA-registered disinfectants that are appropriate for the surface, following label instructions. 
  • Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
  • If a separate bathroom is not available, the bathroom should be cleaned and disinfected after each use by an ill person. 



How to Clean and Disinfect Surfaces:


WEAR GLOVES:

  • Wear disposable gloves when cleaning and disinfecting surfaces. 
  • Gloves should be discarded after each cleaning. 
  • If reusable gloves are used, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other purposes. 
  • Consult the manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning and disinfection products used. 
  • Clean hands immediately after gloves are removed.


CLEAN PRIOR TO DISINFECTING:

  • If surfaces are dirty, they should be cleaned using a detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.


3 CHOICES FOR DISINFECTANT:

  • Alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol
  • Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective.
  • Diluted household bleach solutions


WORKING WITH BLEACH AS DISINFECTANT:

  • Diluted household bleach solutions can be used if appropriate for the surface. 
  • Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. 
  • Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. 
  • Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. 
  • Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.
  • Prepare a bleach solution by mixing: 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water (or)  4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water


WORKING WITH EPA-APPROVED PATHOGENS AS DISINFECTANT:

  • Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. 
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.).
  • For soft (porous) surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes, remove visible contamination if present and clean with appropriate cleaners indicated for use on these surfaces. 
  • Clean items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. 
  • Clean items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items
  • Dry items completely
  • Use products with the EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims that are suitable for porous surfaces.



Clothing, towels, linens and other items that go in the laundry

  • Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry from an ill person and then discard after each use. 
  • If using reusable gloves, those gloves should be dedicated for cleaning and disinfection of surfaces for COVID-19 and should not be used for other household purposes. 
  • Clean hands immediately after gloves are removed.
  • If no gloves are used when handling dirty laundry, be sure to wash hands afterwards.
  • If possible, do not shake dirty laundry. This will minimize the possibility of dispersing virus through the air.
  • Launder items as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. 
  • Launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items
  • Dry items completely. 
  • Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
  • Clean and disinfect clothes hampers according to guidance above for surfaces. 
  • If possible, consider placing a bag liner that is either disposable (can be thrown away) or can be laundered.


Most important: Keep calm and wash your hands.


FDA on Best Antibacterial Soaps

FDA says that the best antibacterial soap does not kill coronavirus and the best soap


 “There’s no data demonstrating that antibacterial products provide additional protection from diseases and infections.  Michele says. “If you use these products because you think they protect you more than soap and water, that’s not correct. If used because of how they feel, there are many other products that have similar formulations but won’t expose your family to unnecessary chemicals.  

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global hygene partners

links around the U.S. and world promote handwashing Visit their websites for 
 resources

Friends in Hygene

Partners around the U.S. and the world to promote handwashing in a variety of settings.  Visit their websites for more information and resources.